still just good enough

Aug 11

23 Female Cartoonists On Drawing Their Bodies -

“I look forward to the time when honest depictions of women’s bodies are a normal thing to look at, instead of some kind of statement.”—Anya Ulinich

“At their best, autobiographical stories allow us to experience empathy for others and perhaps learn something new about ourselves. If that’s empowering young female creators to talk openly about their lives (sexual and otherwise), great. If that’s opening a window for dialogue about the female experience in the context of a largely white, male-dominated field? Also great.” —Lucy Bellwood

“In my early comics, all of my girl characters were super idealized and cute — they looked how I wished I could look.” —Megan Kelso

“I like to have fun with conventional images of what ‘beautiful’ and ‘feminine’ mean to this culture… I think many women have a lot of ambiguity about their self image.” —Roberta Gregory

(Source: fantagraphics, via politicsprose)

Aug 03

Who is the most amazing woman who ever lived. -

robinlafevers:

celebrenithil:

I’m not done reading the list of amazing women people have contributed, but it is such a great - and IMPORTANT - thread that everyone should read.

Historical women! Women scientists! Women leaders! Women of color! Women with disabilities! Women fighting in wars and kicking butts and taking names and saving lives and freeing themselves and others and making music and taking lovers and taking care of children and spearheading revolutions and living to old age or dying for their causes (◡‿◡✿)

And also, keep that link so that every time you stumble upon one of those douchecanoes saying “what have women ever done??”, link them to it and just RUB THEIR FACES IN IT UNTIL THEY BLEED

(✿)

Always reblog amazing women.

Jun 26

scottlava:

“I do the same thing over and over, improving bit by bit. There is always a yearning to achieve more. I’ll continue to climb, trying to reach the top, but no one knows where the top is.”
FOOD WEEK: Day 4

Jiro-sama!

scottlava:

I do the same thing over and over, improving bit by bit. There is always a yearning to achieve more. I’ll continue to climb, trying to reach the top, but no one knows where the top is.”

FOOD WEEK: Day 4

Jiro-sama!

Jun 16

Turning 14 in Cincinnati -

"I worry about surviving."

Let’s Tell This Story Properly | Granta Magazine -

Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi :: 2014 Commonwealth Short Story Prize winner

Jun 09

The Art of Neil Gaiman - Boing Boing

Jun 04

Late lunch :: curry udon (カレーうどん) with egg and green onions #WhatIMadeForLunch

Late lunch :: curry udon (カレーうどん) with egg and green onions #WhatIMadeForLunch

Jun 03

12 Tips for Raising a Child Who Won't Sexually Assault | Psychology Today

May 30

Ezra Update: Japanese alum's 1886 notebook returns to Ithaca

May 08

munchies:

You’re Eating Fake Tortillas, and Diana Kennedy Is Pissed About It
“Why is it that we have allowed people who are totally incompetent in food to design our food?” Diana Kennedy was saying, her gray and white hair lifting lightly in the breeze. “Our food doesn’t have the flavor it used to have. I remember the chile poblanos, full of flavor, thin-fleshed, very dark green, and that big. Now ¡olvidalo!”
“Forget it,” she said. Today, there is actually a four in ten chance a chile poblano served to you anywhere in Mexico has been imported, most likely from China. Kennedy knows this, and the truth seems to burn through her entire being.
A living legend in food, Kennedy started exploring the markets of Mexico’s towns and villages more than fifty years ago, meeting cooks and gathering plants and recipes with the precision of a ethnobotanist. It has been her lifelong project of achieving total intimacy with Mexico’s native ingredients.
Sitting at Kennedy’s outdoor dining table with a tiny glass of mezcal before me, I struggled to imagine the flavor of the chile poblanos back then because fifty years ago, Mexico and the planet were simply different places than they are now. There were less people, for one, and probably a lot less contaminants in the air, in the soil, in the water. In our lives.
There was no transgenic corn in Mexico fifty years ago, and definitely none imported from the United States—as there is today—not in the land where science has agreed that corn was born.
At 91 years old, Diana is old enough to remember what that Mexico tasted like. Her palate fuels her ideas—and anger.
“People are losing taste, especially in the US, and then it passes to Mexico,” Kennedy told me. “It’s ridiculous, but then nobody has paid attention to the agriculture in Mexico.”
Continue

munchies:

You’re Eating Fake Tortillas, and Diana Kennedy Is Pissed About It

“Why is it that we have allowed people who are totally incompetent in food to design our food?” Diana Kennedy was saying, her gray and white hair lifting lightly in the breeze. “Our food doesn’t have the flavor it used to have. I remember the chile poblanos, full of flavor, thin-fleshed, very dark green, and that big. Now ¡olvidalo!”

“Forget it,” she said. Today, there is actually a four in ten chance a chile poblano served to you anywhere in Mexico has been imported, most likely from China. Kennedy knows this, and the truth seems to burn through her entire being.

A living legend in food, Kennedy started exploring the markets of Mexico’s towns and villages more than fifty years ago, meeting cooks and gathering plants and recipes with the precision of a ethnobotanist. It has been her lifelong project of achieving total intimacy with Mexico’s native ingredients.

Sitting at Kennedy’s outdoor dining table with a tiny glass of mezcal before me, I struggled to imagine the flavor of the chile poblanos back then because fifty years ago, Mexico and the planet were simply different places than they are now. There were less people, for one, and probably a lot less contaminants in the air, in the soil, in the water. In our lives.

There was no transgenic corn in Mexico fifty years ago, and definitely none imported from the United States—as there is today—not in the land where science has agreed that corn was born.

At 91 years old, Diana is old enough to remember what that Mexico tasted like. Her palate fuels her ideas—and anger.

“People are losing taste, especially in the US, and then it passes to Mexico,” Kennedy told me. “It’s ridiculous, but then nobody has paid attention to the agriculture in Mexico.”

Continue